UAF graduate student Claire Montgomerie handles a lynx kitten she
found at a den site near Wiseman this summer.
Photo courtesy Claire Montgomerie.
Ned Rozell

In her study of one of the farthest north lynx populations in North America this summer, Claire Montgomerie used her ears. While looking at the satellite tracker a female lynx was wearing, Montgomerie saw the animal was hanging around a hillside north of the Arctic Circle, not far from Coldfoot.

The University of Alaska Fairbanks graduate student suspected the lynx might have paused in its constant wandering to give birth to a den of kittens.

Montgomerie enlisted a few helpers from her base in Wiseman and headed to where she’d seen clusters of tracking points on her computer. After about 45 minutes in the boreal forest near the Dalton Highway, she got her break.

“I heard this little hissing noise,” Montgomerie said. “It was very subtle, like a breath.”

Hui Zhang, a physics professor and scientist studying the
magnetosphere at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, stands in her
office on the seventh floor of the Geophysical Institute. Her many
conference badges hang on the wall behind her. Photo by Josh Hartman.
Josh Hartman

Deep inside the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ Geophysical Institute is Hui Zhang’s office. The building’s air ventilation system fills the room with a dull hum and three desks line the mostly bare, white walls. Behind the door a large bookshelf holds scientific papers, textbooks and journal publications.

The walls are filled with 38 conference badges hanging in a few orderly columns with many more in a pile on a nearby desk. The only other items are a topographical map of Alaska, postcards from places that Zhang has visited and a NASA-themed calendar featuring rainfall charts.

The barren appearance of her office would not lead someone to conclude that she had been there for five years, but dressing it up has never been a priority.

“I just don’t have time to decorate,” said Zhang, a professor of physics and geophysical scientist.

Interested in joining the new Science Communication Club? We are a network of faculty, staff and students that meets regularly to discuss and encourage science communication. Science communication is important to engage the public in science and what we are doing at UAF. We discuss various science communication efforts, including science writing, talks, documentaries, podcasts, and outreach events. We support each other, from offering advice to sharing opportunities.

If you're interested, please email Margaret Cysewski at mhcysewski@alaska.edu to learn more and join our online collaboration space.

Please note that new physical addresses have been assigned to all campus buildings. The new address for the GI is 2156 Koyukuk Drive, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775. Please update your email signature lines, online profiles, and other relevant communications accordingly. If you regularly make online purchases, remember to update the shipping address saved in your profile on any vendor sites. If you have existing stationery or publications, you may elect to use your existing supply before reprinting.

If you are not physically located in the GI building, you can find the physical address for your building at: www.uaf.edu/fs/resource-information/new-addresses/.

Please make sure you use the correct GI and UAF logos on all your research posters. You can download the logos at these websites:

Official GI Logo

Official UAF Logos

For assistance with GI and UAF logos, contact Design Services at x7146.

Condo for sale

Condo for sale

Affordable, cozy and well-kept top floor condominium unit located in a desirable neighborhood in Fairbanks that would be perfect for faculty or a graduate school student! The unit faces south, with a full-length (covered!) deck that looks out onto the Hamilton Acres Park. It has a designated parking space, open floor plan, laundry facilities on-site, and an additional storage closet. The bedroom is a fantastic size, comfortably accommodating a king-size bed, with a walk in closet that easily holds all the Alaskan gear! In 2016 the building the unit is in had a new high-efficiency boiler installed as well as a new roof. Very convenient location for shopping, bus lines, and Ft. Wainwright access. Enjoy a winter of convenience staying warm and connected to high-speed internet! Excellent opportunity for a first time home buyer or investor or someone who travels frequently and would like to have a home base.

Here is the listing for the condo, including pictures.

Affordable, cozy and well-kept top floor condominium unit located in a desirable neighborhood in Fairbanks that would be perfect for faculty or a graduate school student! The unit faces south, with a full-length (covered!) deck that looks out onto the Hamilton Acres Park. It has a designated...
Do you have something you want to advertise?

Do you have something you want to advertise?

If you have something you would like to sell or are looking for, you can advertise in the weekly newsletter for free! We can run your advertisement as long as you would like us to. Just scroll to the bottom of the newsletter and click on "submit an item for the newsletter" or email Sue Mitchell with the details.

If you have something you would like to sell or are looking for, you can advertise in the weekly newsletter for free! We can run your advertisement as long as you would like us to. Just scroll to the bottom of the newsletter and click on "submit an item for the newsletter" or email Sue Mitchell...

Science Event of the Week

Oct 11, 1982

In 1982, Halley's Comet was observed on its 30th recorded visit to Earth, first detected using the 5-m (200-in) Hale Telescope at the Mount Palomar Observatory by a team of astronomers led by David Jewett and G. Edward Danielson. They found the comet, beyond the orbit of Saturn, about 11 AU (1.6 billion km) from the Sun. While 50 million times fainter than the faintest objects our eyes can see, they needed to use not only the largest American telescope but also special electronic equipment developed for the Space Telescope. In 1705, Halley used Newton's theories to compute the orbit and correctly predicted the return of this comet about every 76 years. After his death, for correctly predicting its reappearance, it was named after Halley.