From above, Chris Maio (in green) and graduate student Reyce Bogardus pull a sediment core from a lake near Cape Espenberg. Chris Maio photo.
Ned Rozell

Cape Espenberg is an eyebrow of sand, driftwood, and low plants on the northeast corner of the Seward Peninsula. It is now quiet except for the swish of the wind through cottongrass and the songs of birds, but archaeologists have found a large village site there.

People lived on the cape for more than 4,000 years. Some of their descendants now live in the villages of Shishmaref and Deering. No one knows why the ancient people left.

Just a few feet above the Chukchi Sea, Cape Espenberg might have been hammered by storms that shoved water onto land. Or maybe an absence of storms meant driftwood was so rare people could not build homes. A researcher is using evidence from a nearby lake to see how often extreme storm surges have hit the area over the last few thousand years.

Hubbard Glacier, restless as ever, calves into Disenchantment Bay north of Yakutat. Ned Rozell photo.
Ned Rozell

The forces shaping Alaska never sleep, especially near Yakutat.

I visited the fishing town of about 800 people and many dogs a few years back. My assignment was to write about scientists studying Hubbard Glacier, which slammed the door on Russell Fiord in summer 2002, creating the largest glacier-dammed lake in the world for a few weeks until the dam broke.

The relentless advance of Hubbard Glacier takes center stage in Yakutat, but the area surrounding the town is one of the world’s great examples of geology in action.

To the west of Yakutat, Mt. St. Elias rises like a white pyramid to an elevation of 18,008 feet in one of the world’s most dramatic transitions from sea to summit. The Yakutat block, a chunk of Earth’s crust larger in area than Pennsylvania, is responsible for forming Mt. St. Elias and the other mountains of the St. Elias and Chugach ranges.

Get ready for the Spring 2019 UAF Blood Drive! The dates and times are as follows:

Tuesday, April 16th from 8:00am-3:00pm at CTC in Room 116
Wednesday, April 17th from 8:00am-3:00pm in the Wood Center Ballroom
Thursday, April 18th from 8:00am-3:00pm in Akasofu Room 501
Friday, April 19th from 8:00am-1:00pm in Akasofu Room 501

UAF HAARP announced their sixth research campaign, scheduled for March 25-28, 2019. Investigations range from practical to fundamental physical theory. Updates will be posted on Facebook and Twitter @uafhaarp and @ctfallen. Learn more at https://www.gi.alaska.edu/facilities/haarp

GIGSA, along with the Mather Library, will be hosting their annual book and bake sale on Tuesday, March 26th from 9 am to 4 pm in the Elvey Globe Room.

All proceeds go to the GIGSA Graduate Student Travel Grant Fund and the GI Mather Library.

There will be books of all kinds available: geoscience, physics, biology, chemistry, math, climate change/atmospheric chemistry, other non-fiction, foreign language, fiction books, and more!

If you are looking for a sweet treat on Tuesday, March 26 there will also be baked goods available.

If you have any book donations, please drop them off in the Globe Room on sale day between 9 to 10 am. If you cannot make it the day of the sale and still want to donate books, please contact the Mather Library (uaf-gi-library@alaska.edu or 474-7503).

The Belmont Forum is pleased to announce the launch of a second Collaborative Research Action focused on Arctic region. The title of this international funding opportunity is Resilience in a Rapidly Changing Arctic. The call aims at bringing together researchers and other expertise across the globe to develop proposals from integrated teams of scientists and stakeholders to address key areas of arctic resilience understanding and action. This collaboration of academic and non-academic knowledge systems constitutes a transdisciplinary approach that will advance not only understanding of the fundamentals of arctic resilience but also spur action, inform decision-making, and translate into solutions for resilience.

Proposing consortia shall address at least two of seven interconnected elements of resilience as described in the Arctic Resilience Report of the Arctic Council: natural, social, financial, cultural and human capitals; infrastructure; and knowledge. Given the complexity and scope of the challenges, research consortia must be truly transdisciplinary, thus including researchers from: a) social sciences/humanities/economy and b) natural sciences/technology, as well as c) societal partners (i.e. citizens, civil society organizations), using a co-design, co-development and co-implementation approach.

Funders from 10 countries have committed resources for this call: Canada, Denmark, France, Japan, Iceland, Netherlands, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and USA. The call aims to support medium-sized research projects with 3 to 4 years duration, with a recommended budget of up to 1.5 M€ each.

Resilience in a Rapidly Changing Arctic encourages international cooperation by requiring that projects are eligible for award by at least three of the funders supporting the call. Partners that are not eligible for funding through this call can participate in the research project at their own expense. Please ensure that your project theme is compliant with funding specifications by contacting the listed Organizational Contact Points in the relevant organizational annex documents for this call.

Proposing consortia seeking partners to meet the transdisciplinary or transnational requirements are encouraged to utilize existing Arctic and other networks to build their project teams, such as the Future Earth Open Network (https://network.futureearth.org/home), the International Arctic Science Council, IASC (https://iasc.info) or the International Arctic Social Sciences Association, IASSA (https://iassa.org) among others.

Deadline for proposals is on 14 June 2019.
Applications shall be submitted via the Belmont Forum application portal https://bfgo.org.

Details of the call and the application process are provided via the application portal https://bfgo.org and the Belmont Forum web site: http://www.belmontforum.org. There are also training modules available for proposers on the Belmont Forum YouTube channel. Before starting to prepare proposals, applicants are advised to contact their funding organisation(s) as listed in the annex documents for the call.

Counseling Services are Available
Volunteers Needed
Students, staff, faculty, and community members are welcome to volunteer!

FREE COUNSELING

Graduate level counseling students are looking for volunteers who would like to receive free counseling.
Sessions will last 50 minutes and occur one time per week.
Sessions will be held 2/18/2019 to 4/25/2019.

For more information, please contact: Valerie Gifford, Ph.D. (vmgifford@alaska.edu), (907) 474-1999.

Thanks to the generous support of Vice Chancellor Hinzman and the Research Professionals Group, we are again taking a big stride towards creating a culture of safety among UAF researchers.

Nanook Recreation has coordinated a great set of Field Safety courses for Spring 2019, all of which are free to UAF researchers. Simply call the Outdoor Adventure office at 474-6027 to sign up.

A full list of the courses can also be found at https://uaf.edu/recreation/fieldsafety/.

Priority given to UAF Researchers, but we will open some of the courses to other staff and students two weeks prior to course start dates. Researchers, please sign up in advance. Others, please wait until 2 weeks prior.

If you sign up, please show up. Having people no-show to a free course displaces another students.

Please forward this information to your new graduate assistants or faculty.

We are happy to offer these classes and value your feedback. If you need something slightly different, just let us know.

Contact Mark Oldmixon at mtoldmixon@alaska.edu or 474-6709 for more information.

Would you like to know when all the cool science events are happening at UAF? When you’re putting on a cool science event would you like help getting that information out?

The UAF Science Calendar posts information on science lectures, seminars, workshops, thesis/dissertation defenses, special events and other UAF science-related activities. Submit calendar items by email to UAF-SciCal@alaska.edu. Please include the name of the event, the sponsoring unit, name and affiliation of the presenter, location, date, start and end times, and a contact person's name, email address and/or phone number. Information can be submitted well in advance of the event as long as any changes to the information are also submitted as they become known.

How to subscribe to the Science Calendar

  • Visit http://www.cgc.uaf.edu/calendar.html to view the UAF Science Calendar
  • At the bottom-right corner of the calendar there is a Google Calendar widget (with a white-on-blue 'plus' sign). Click on the link.
  • Your calendar will pop up in your browser, with a prompt to "Add calendar." Click "Add." The UAF Science Calendar should now appear in the list on the left of your calendar labeled "Other calendars."

If you are logged into two Google accounts at once, for example your UA account and your personal account, the UAF Science Calendar may appear in the wrong one. If so, log out of all Google accounts except for the one that you wish to modify, OR log into it in a different browser, and repeat steps 2 and 3.

If you have questions about the science calendar, email UAF-SciCal@alaska.edu.

UAF has updated to Banner 9. This has made it more difficult for staff in the GI Human Relations office to locate employees without ID numbers. When sending HR any requests regarding yourself or your employees, please include your University/Student ID number. We really appreciate your assistance with this.

Please make sure you use the correct GI and UAF logos on all your research posters. You can download the logos at these websites:

Official GI Logo

Official UAF Logos

For assistance with GI and UAF logos, contact Design Services at x7146.

Hats for Sale

Hats for Sale

Three hats for sale, see description for details.

Hat #1: Red fox fur hat - $100
This is a beautiful and warm hat made from combination of red fox fur and white musquash fur. Fur is high quality and shiny.

Hat #2, the red suede and silver trim, has been sold.

Hat #3: Women's felt hat - $25
This hat is soft and warm, with adjustable fit and a white faux fur trim.

Please contact Elena Suleimani (ensuleimani@alaska.edu) if you are interested in any of these hats.
Hat #1: Red fox fur hat - $100 This is a beautiful and warm hat made from combination of red fox fur and white musquash fur. Fur is high quality and shiny. Hat #2, the red suede and silver trim, has been sold. Hat #3: Women's felt hat - $25 This hat is soft and warm, with adjustable fit and a white... Please contact Elena Suleimani (ensuleimani@alaska.edu) if you are interested in any of these hats.
Do you have something you want to advertise?

Do you have something you want to advertise?

If you have something you would like to sell or are looking for, you can advertise in the weekly newsletter for free! We can run your advertisement as long as you would like us to. Just scroll to the bottom of the newsletter and click on "submit an item for the newsletter" or email Sue Mitchell with the details.

If you have something you would like to sell or are looking for, you can advertise in the weekly newsletter for free! We can run your advertisement as long as you would like us to. Just scroll to the bottom of the newsletter and click on "submit an item for the newsletter" or email Sue Mitchell...

Science Event of the Week

Mar 18, 1965

In 1965, Voskhod 2 was launched into space carrying Aleksey Leonov and Pavel Belyayev aboard. On the second orbit Leonov left the spacecraft through the air lock while still tethered to the vessel. He was the first man to climb out of a spacecraft in space. While outside, he took motion pictures and practiced moving outside of the spacecraft for 10 minutes. Voskhod 2 made 17 orbits at about 110 miles (177 km) above earth.