Scientists measure a cow's respiration at a lab in Toluca, Mexico. Photo by Octavio Castelán-Ortega.
Ned Rozell

Many creatures, including you and me, emit methane from time to time. Microbes within our guts break down one substance and turn it into another, making methane in the process. Northern lakes and tundra plants also leak methane. That gas, too, is from microbes, which become more active as the air warms.

Scientists study methane because of its ability to warm the world — methane is 28 times more potent than carbon dioxide as a greenhouse gas.

Because of this, a number of scientists at a recent conference showed their work on finding manmade sources of methane, from electronically sniffing manhole covers in Cincinnati to sampling the emissions from cows in Mexico.

Emma Marcucci

In the beginning of January I attended the 90-minute Green Dot overview training. I encourage others in the GI to do the same. If you were like me, you may have heard of Green Dot and generally known that it's related to making campus safer, but not know much more than that.

The 90-minute overview (there is also a 4-hour bystander training) goes into what is a red versus a green dot and explains ways to be a green dot that fit within your comfort level and role on campus. The very basics are: a red dot is an incident of harm or violence (be it words, actions, behaviors) and a green dot is a choice to intervene in some way to stop it (reactive) or to create a safe and supportive environment to prevent such incidents (proactive). When there are more green dots than red dots on a map, we create a safe place with less violence.

Alaska NSF EPSCoR, Alaska INBRE and the Alaska BLaST program are sponsoring "Visualize This!," a visualization competition open to researchers across the UA system.

Entries will be accepted in two categories:

Print - photos, illustrations, posters and graphics
Video - videos and interactive visualizations

First, second and third place in each category will receive $1,000, $500 and $250, respectively, and 10 entrants will receive $50 honorable mentions. Entries will be displayed at UAF Research Day on April 25 and at a First Friday event in Decision Theater North on May 5.

Visualizations must relate to a current University of Alaska research topic. Entries can come from individuals or teams, and must include participation by a UA scientist.

The deadline is March 31, 2017. Contest rules are at http://www.alaska.edu/files/epscor/pdfs/Visualize-This-rules.pdf and enter to register here.

The UAF Alaska Summer Research Academy will accept applications from Feb. 1 – April 15 for its 2017 middle and high school programs.

The academy will be held each day from July 10 – 21. Students accepted into the program will spend two weeks with a small group and two instructors exploring a topic in science, engineering, math or technology. The program is offered through the UAF College of Natural Science and Mathematics.

The middle school program is for students who will be in grades six to eight in fall 2017. The high school program is for students who will be in grades nine to 12 in fall 2017. Financial aid may be available for qualified students.

There are five middle school modules:

  • Getting to Know Your Birds at the Sky Islands of Interior Alaska
  • Investigating Patterns of Life
  • Mapping Permafrost Adventures
  • Meet the Mammals
  • The Air Up There — Investigating Air Pollution and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere

There are eight high school modules:

  • Biomedicine
  • Disease Detectives
  • DIY Data Devices: Sensor Building for Environmental Science
  • Environmental Chemistry of the Arctic
  • Reconstructing Evolution: The Mathematics of DNA
  • Time Sleuths — Archaeology in Interior Alaska
  • Veterinary Medicine
  • Web Development

The Time Sleuths module includes a six-day expedition.

For the application and more information, visit www.uaf.edu/asra.

CONTACTS: Christa Mulder, ASRA director, at 474-7703 or via email at cpmulder@alaska.edu. Lynnette Dunn, ASRA administrative assistant, at 474-7221 or via email at lddunn@alaska.edu

Science for Alaska Lecture Series

Free public lecture series

Tuesdays, 7 p.m. at the Raven Landing Center
1222 Cowles Street

Jan. 31 - The almost forgotten earthquake of the Alaska Gold Rush
Carl Tape, UAF

Feb. 7 - How do we adapt to Alaska's changing environment?
Anupma Prakash, UAF

Feb. 14 - Volcanic gases: Message from a volcano's interior
Taryn Lopez, UAF

Feb. 21 - How changes in permafrost will affect our lives
Vladimir Romanovsky, UAF

Feb. 28 - Exploring the limits of the solar system: NASA's missions to Jupiter and Pluto
Peter Delamere, UAF

March 7 - Glaciers: The biggest losers
Andy Aschwanden, UAF

Download the flyer here.

Cartel_TITCVM_2017.pdf

For undergraduate students (M.Sc. & Ph.D. students are also welcome)

Pre-registration deadline: Feb. 15
Registration deadline: March 3

The program offers 50 hours of teaching, all in English (classroom + lab + field activities), on volcano seismology, microgravimetry, ground deformation, fluid geochemistry, thermal imaging and additional volcano monitoring techniques.

Earn 2 ECTS credits from the University of La Laguna (ULL)

More information: www.involcan.org
Download the flyer here.

The Resource and Advocacy Center at UAF provides advocacy and resources referrals to students, staff and faculty survivors of power-based personal violence. The office is staffed by a confidential advocacy services coordinator and volunteers. The center provides a confidential resource on campus for survivors. The coordinator is a fulltime staff member of the Interior Alaska Center for Non-Violent Living.

Location: Wood Center 130

Phone: 474-6360

Email: uafadvocate@iacnvl.org

Advocacy and support

The Resource and Advocacy Center and the Interior Alaska Center for Non-Violent Living provide confidential support to survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and dating violence and can help with the following:

  • Support through exploring options, safety planning, crisis intervention, providing referrals, accompaniment to appointments etc.
  • Emergency shelter is available to survivors (and their children) who are in need to safe housing. Emergency transportation is also available.
  • Assists with applications for housing, public assistance etc.
  • The following support groups are available: H.O.P.E. (Hold on Pain Ends), a student led support group for survivors at UAF
  • Title IX information and support, advocates are not mandated reports to the title ix office but can provide information about the title ix and support survivors who want o go through the process.
  • Help and resources

If you've been sexually harassed or assaulted, you have the right to legal, physical and psychological help. You are not alone.

For medical help, call 911 or go to the nearest ER.
To talk to someone confidentially, call the Resource and Advocacy Center at any hour at 474-6360 or the Student Health and Counseling Center at 474-7043.
To file a police report, call 911
To initiate a Title IX investigation, visit www.uaf.edu/edu/titleix or call the Title IX office at 474-7300.

The Forthcoming Big Ice Age, a special presentation by Dr. Syun-Ichi Akasofu, will be in the Elvey Globe Room
2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 27.

You can download the flyer here.

The 2017 QuantumSpatial (AeroMap) wall calendar is available to pick up in the GINA office suite, 111 WRRB. Go in the door; the calendars are in the cubicle on the immediate left.

Check out the real-time satellite imagery from GINA on the NWS forecaster desktop display while you're in the cubicle.

Geophysical Institute hooded sweatshirts and HAARP-themed t-shirts, as well as challenge coins, are for sale in our online store!

We also have Area 49 pint glasses for sale for $10 in the Public Relations office, 608 Elvey.

GI Hoodies will be available for pick up after December 12, but are available to preorder now.

This is a fundraiser for our next open house at HAARP and the GI Awards Banquet.

Please note the new email address for Design Services: uaf-designservices@alaska.edu. Please add this to your contact list and remove the old address! Our previous address (design@gi.alaska.edu) will be retired at the end of this calendar year.

Please make sure you use the correct GI and UAF logos on all your research posters. You can download the logos at these websites:

Official GI Logo

Official UAF Logos

For assistance with GI and UAF logos, contact Design Services at x7146.

Application deadline: Feb, 15, 2017

The Marshall Space Flight Center is offering faculty fellowships for qualified STEM faculty at U.S. colleges and universities to conduct research with NASA colleagues during a 10-week residential program in Huntsville, Alabama.

Faculty fellows will receive stipends of $15,000 (associate professor, research faculty), $17,000 (associate professor), or $19,000 (professor).

A relocation allowance of $1,500 will be provided to those fellows who live more than 50 miles from MSFC as well as a $500 travel supplement for one roundtrip.

Applicants must be U.S. citizens who hold full-time teaching or research appointments at accredited U.S. universities or colleges.

During the 10-week program, fellows are required to conduct their research on-site at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

Applications are due to Rachael Damiani at rachael.damiani@uah.edu by Feb. 15, 2017. If you have any questions, please call (256) 824-6076.

The announcement and application can be downloaded at http://tinyurl.com/MFFP2017.

The 2017 Global Change Student Research Grant Competition request for proposals is now available at www.cgc.uaf.edu, and in hardcopy from the Graduate School (202 Eielson) or URSA (301 Bunnell).

Graduate students may submit proposals for up to $10,000 for one year, while undergraduates are eligible for up to $7,500. Students should review the RFP carefully before preparing a proposal. Among changes this year, students need to work with their department-level proposal coordinators to prepare their budget.

Deadline to submit proposals: 5 p.m. Alaska Standard Time, Friday, Feb.10, 2017

For more information contact: Barb Hameister at bahameister@alaska.edu or 474-5818.

Each year at the Annual Geophysical Institute Awards Banquet we recognize select staff members of the Geophysical Institute for their contributions to the Geophysical Institute and the Fairbanks community. We depend on you to put forward nominations for those individuals deserving of recognition.

Nominate a staff member of the Geophysical Institute for their service and recognition at the 2016 Annual Awards Banquet scheduled for Feb. 24, 2017.

Nominations should be submitted through the 2016 Staff Nomination Form here.

We ask that you please provide a short but detailed summary of why you feel this particular individual is deserving of the specified award. To assist the committee in selecting a winner for each award, we will be limiting your nominations to 4000 characters or less (this is about a page). The form will have a space for you to input this summary.

The categories are as follows:

Community Service Award Criteria
This award recognizes a staff member who goes above and beyond to contribute to the wellbeing of the community around them. Their generous efforts are recognized for the work they do for the GI community, the greater Fairbanks area, and/or across the state.

Outstanding Staff Performance Award Criteria
This award recognizes a staff member who has made a substantial contribution to the GI mission by going above and beyond their job duties and/or having provided exceptional contributions to the unit while acting as a positive role model to their peers. This individual would not only be a valuable asset to the GI but would make it a point to share their knowledge and expertise to create a better work environment.

Outstanding Student Performance Award Criteria
This award recognizes a student staff member who has gone above and beyond the expectations of those duties written into an everyday student position. Please note, this individual should not be nominated based off of their academic standing. This award is meant to recognize student employees for their professional contributions here at the Geophysical Institute.

If you have questions regarding the nomination process, please contact Kimberly Cummins at kdcummins@alaska.edu.

Science Fair Judges Needed

Science Fair Judges Needed

Do you want to support future generations of scientists? Need a break from your research? Barnette Magnet School’s Science Fair of 2017 is coming up on March 7, 2017 and we are looking for members of our community and local experts to be judges. Judges will review projects from different categories and topics, assess projects and student presentations using a provided rubric and give feedback to students. Contact Elizabeth Gustafson at elizabethgustafson9@gmail.com for to sign up or get more information!

Do you want to support future generations of scientists? Need a break from your research? Barnette Magnet School’s Science Fair of 2017 is coming up on March 7, 2017 and we are looking for members of our community and local experts to be judges. Judges will review projects from different categories...
Lobben felt boots for sale

Lobben felt boots for sale

A pair of Lobben felt boots, almost like new, for sale. The size is a little bit too small for a US size 13 foot, which is why they are almost like new even though I bought them years ago. I think they would fit a size 12 very comfortably. Make me an offer.

Contact Jeff Freymueller, jfreymueller@alaska.edu or 907-474-7286.

A pair of Lobben felt boots, almost like new, for sale. The size is a little bit too small for a US size 13 foot, which is why they are almost like new even though I bought them years ago. I think they would fit a size 12 very comfortably. Make me an offer. Contact Jeff Freymueller, jfreymueller@...
Bedroom for rent

Bedroom for rent

Bedroom for rent in modest Chena Ridge home. 12-min drive to campus. Private bathroom, use of kitchen, washer/dryer. $700, all utilities included. Contact Lisa Drew, lisadrewlisadrew@yahoo.com.

Bedroom for rent in modest Chena Ridge home. 12-min drive to campus. Private bathroom, use of kitchen, washer/dryer. $700, all utilities included. Contact Lisa Drew, lisadrewlisadrew@yahoo.com .
Do you have something you want to advertise?

Do you have something you want to advertise?

If you have something you would like to sell or are looking for, you can advertise in the weekly newsletter for free! We can run your advertisement as long as you would like us to. Just scroll to the bottom of the newsletter and click on "submit an item for the newsletter" or email Lea with the details.

If you have something you would like to sell or are looking for, you can advertise in the weekly newsletter for free! We can run your advertisement as long as you would like us to. Just scroll to the bottom of the newsletter and click on "submit an item for the newsletter" or email Lea with the...

Science Event of the Week

Jan 17, 1929

In 1929, Edwin Hubble published the now classic paper that first showed the universe was expanding (and later provided observational evidence for the Big Bang theory). But Hubble explicitly made no such an interpretation. He left that to the reader. His paper was simply titled “A Relation Between Distance and Radial Velocity Among Extra-Galactic Nebulae.” He listed the data that he plotted on a graph. It showed a roughly linear relationship between radial velocity for various galaxies and their distance. It dramatically showed that the the further away the galaxy, the faster it is moving away from the observer. However, stating that future new data might change the interpretation, he discretely wrote that he thought it “premature to discuss in detail the obvious consequences of the present results.”