John Shook of Fairbanks skis toward Serpentine Hot Springs on the Seward Peninsula. Photo by Ned Rozell.
Ned Rozell

Stone spear points from Serpentine Hot Springs on the Seward Peninsula hint that ancient people may have migrated northward between ice sheets from warmer parts of America, bringing their technology with them.

Heather Smith, an anthropologist at Eastern New Mexico University, wrote a recent paper based on spear-point fragments she and others found near Serpentine Hot Springs during the summers of 2010 and 2011.

In her study, she wrote the stone points represent “either Clovis groups moving north through the ice-free corridor to northern Yukon and Alaska, or the interaction of Clovis groups with humans already present in the northwestern Subarctic and Arctic.”

In the volcanology lab with Jessica Larsen, associate professor. Photo by Josh Hartman.
Josh Hartman

“I am kind of an amateur artist. I've always practiced some form of art because I've found it's a really great counterpoint to science. I feel like it's very synergistic. Actually, before I majored in geology, I was considering being an art major. When I was in high school, a class I took over and over again — because I just loved it and it was a great way to get out of the high school mentality — was metalsmithing or jewelry arts. So I have a little studio in my garage and I still do that.”

In the volcanology lab with Jessica Larsen, associate professor.

The Geophysical Institute will be the "Super Saturday” focus at the Fairbanks Children’s Museum on Saturday, Nov. 17.

Astronomy in the portable planetarium will be showcased at this kid-friendly outreach event.

The Fairbanks Children's Museum is looking for others who would like to help represent GI research by bringing a few hands-on learning activities to young children on Saturday Nov. 17 between 2-4 p.m. Please contact Doreen Hayward at dehayward@alaska.edu or call x1910 to confirm participation.

Inside the Mather Library.

Noticing a chill in the air? Not wanting to go out during your lunch or break? Come visit Mather Library to …

  • Fly a mini-drone. Drone flying times are noon - 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Fridays so faculty, staff, and students can enjoy an expanded opportunity to fly.

  • Work on a jigsaw puzzle. Puzzle pieces are laid out. Our first puzzle is a picture of a library - how appropriate!

  • Enjoy Knitting Hour on Thursdays, noon - 1 p.m. Bring your yarn/thread work (knitting, crocheting, weaving, needlepoint, embroidery, etc.) and converse with others while you work on a project.

  • Play chess on a one-of-a-kind dinosaur chess set.

  • Play cribbage. The library has a cribbage board and a deck of cards to use; just ask at Circulation.

  • Read a book. Find a cozy spot with your favorite book or find a book in Mather's "bring one, take one" lending area.


Mather Library … Books, meeting spaces, and so much more!

For more information contact Mather Library staff at uaf-gi-library@alaska.edu or 907- 474-7512 or 474-7503.

Please mark your calendar for the GI/IARC December First Friday on Dec 7. Tohru Saito is organizing a First Friday event in the Akasofu building lobby area.

Please consider displaying your art work and art projects! Similar to last year, contact Tohru Saito if you are interested in participating or if you know anyone who might be interested in displaying art work such as drawings, paintings, photos, cool computer graphics, satellite or drone images, etc. that you have created.

It does not have to be science-related, but if your art has any connections to science that would be great. Two-dimensional or 3D art are welcome, as are craft objects.

The event is very informal, and family members, former employees and visitors are also welcome to participate.

Tohru Saito also proposes a pre-AGU poster session aimed at graduate students and visitors to take place Thursday, Dec. 6 on the fifth floor of the Akasofu building. Others may be invited to participate depending on available poster display boards. This is an opportunity to display your poster before the actual AGU meeting and perhaps function as practice. Posters must be printed prior to hanging, there will not be a printer at the poster session.

Please contact Tohru Saito at tsaito@alaska.edu if you are interested in taking part in the GI/IARC December First Friday event. This year the North Star Strings will be be performing at the event.

A new blood drive is around the corner next Friday, Oct. 19, and the blood bank is in need of your blood donation. Please pass the word!

There is always a blood shortage. Donated blood is essential to saving people's lives who have been involved in a car accident, surgery or a birth with complications. The Blood Bank of Alaska will be at the West Ridge (Akasofu #501) on Friday, Oct. 19. See the attached flyer. Please make it your priority to donate blood at this convenient opportunity.

The Blood Bank needs at least 40 donors to make it worth their while. Donors are strongly encouraged to pre-register for a specific time (https://donate.bloodbankofalaska.org), which will eliminate long lines and make the process more efficient. Of course, walk-ins are possible to those who were not able to schedule an appointment.

For those who to want schedule a time slot that would work best with their tight schedule, follow the instructions below.

1. Sign in at https://donate.bloodbankofalaska.org)
2. Once signed in, select DONATE NOW, and you will get to the window below.
3. Select "City Search".
4. fill in the blank box with Fairbanks, select Search,
5. In the search results choose "UAF International Arctic Research Center"- Schedule

Going to AGU? Consider participating in the Flash Talk Series at the UAF booth this year.

Flash talks are short talks meant to quickly engage an audience around a certain science topic. They are usually intended to encourage awareness and interest in science. If you are giving a larger talk at AGU, a flash talk can be a preview of your larger talk. You can also do a science or tech demo as a flash talk.

If you’re interested in participating, please fill out a form here: https://goo.gl/forms/yyidhIArTsO31TjN2

We will be finalizing the flash talk schedule in November. Please submit your proposals by Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018.

Flash talks are not limited to faculty, or even those giving an AGU presentation. Graduate students, staff, post docs and others are encouraged to participate!

Attached is a pdf with more information about flash talks.

For more information, contact Fritz Freudenberger at ffreudenberger@alaska.edu or 907-474-7185

A new citizen science app is available from the GLOBE Observer program, called Land Cover — Adopt a Pixel. Participants use their smartphones to take geolocated photos of the landscape and optionally can add in more information.

Launch of the app has received a good response from the public, but more data are needed, especially in these states: North and South Carolina, North and South Dakota, Florida, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oklahoma and Wyoming

NASA's GLOBE team would love to get observations from more people!

Why Adopt a Pixel is Important for Scientists
The app data are geographically aligned with the pixels in satellite images and provide more details of Earth’s surface than we get from satellites. Scientists are particularly interested in observations that include the more in-depth analysis option in the app (vs. simply taking photos). They plan to use all of this data in combination with satellite data to study Earth’s processes and systems (like the carbon cycle, nutrient cycling, climate change, etc.) and topics such as forest ecology, fire, urban growth, farming practices, invasive species, grassland restoration — pretty much anything that relies on accurate data about what is covering the surface of our Earth.

What’s In It for Visitors and Interpreters?
I’m sure you are aware that citizen science provides a powerful opportunity for visitors to connect with and learn about the environment. And there is evidence that participation in citizen science helps people become more involved in environmental stewardship.

What’s cool about GLOBE Observer is that we can encourage people to make observations wherever they are — on a trail, on vacation, in their towns, etc. and then help them to consider how all of these places are connected. For example, historical sites can challenge people to make observations and then think about how the historical landscape affected the way people lived, changes to the land and how that impacts life today. Then visitors can be prompted to think about how decisions are made about land use today and consider making observations in their own community.

The app is free and easy to use and you don’t need to be connected to the internet while collecting data. You can get the app from Google Play or the App Store — search for “GLOBE Observer.” Once you download the app, register. Then open the Land Cover module — an interactive tutorial that will teach you how to make observations. (If you already have the GLOBE Observer app you can access the new Land Cover module directly.)

We know that when people contribute observations to citizen science projects they get a positive sense of making a difference. It’s a great example of the multiplier effect of individual efforts when thousands of individual observations add up to a clearer understanding of how our planet works.
Thanks for considering contributing to this citizen science effort, and for all you do to advance stewardship of Earth!

The UAF Student Health and Counseling Center is scheduling flu shots next month for the Fairbanks campus. These are being offered at no charge to employees, spouses and students. These flu shot clinics are for adults only (18 and over) as they don't carry the pediatric doses.

Tuesday, Oct. 16, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
109 Butrovich (Regents' Conference Room)

Friday, Oct. 19, 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Facilities Services (in the Hallway)

Tuesday, Oct. 23, 5 – 7 p.m.
Community and Technical College (CTC, in the Ruth Lister gathering area)

Some information from the Health Center on this year's vaccine:
The UAF Student Health and Counseling Center will be offering the quadrivalent (meaning it covers 4 viruses) inactivated vaccine which is given as a shot. The viruses covered are: A/Michigan/45/2015(H1N1)pdm09-like virus, A/Singapore/INFIMH-16-0019/2016(H3N2)-like virus, B/Colorado/06/2017-like virus (Victoria lineage) and the B/Phuket/3073/2013-like (Yamagata lineage).

Trick or Treat Activity for kids!
The GI has been invited to participate in IARC's trick or treat event on Tuesday, Oct. 30! Employees and students are welcome to bring in their children from 4 – 5p.m. for trick or treating through offices of IARC and GI.

GI offices wishing to participate are encouraged to decorate their office and have a bowl of candy ready. Offices that are participating can post an orange pumpkin on their door. Offices that do not post an orange pumpkin will not be disturbed.

If your office or area would like to sign up, please follow this link: Trick or Treat 2018
If your office does not sign up, it will not be included in the map handed out to trick-or-treaters.

Halloween Movies!
In addition, the poll to vote for the two movies to be shown in the fifth floor lounge is now open! You have until this Friday, Oct. 5, at 4 p.m. to vote. We will announce the winners on Monday.

Please follow this link if you would like to vote for a movie: Classic Halloween Movies Voting Poll 2018.

The University of Delaware will be hosting an innovative workshop about polar science research communication to the media called Polar-izing Your Science Impacts: Turn your Research into Science Stories and Take Science Stories to the Classroom.

Registration
Only 40 scientists will be selected for participation in this project. A $300 stipend is available for scientists who develop a science communication piece for the Polar Literacy Initiative. Limited travel funds/scholarships are available for advanced graduate students. The workshop will run Wednesday – Friday, Jan. 9 – 11 at the University of Delaware in Newark, Del..

Applications will be accepted until Saturday, Dec. 1, 2018.

Please apply online at:

https://polar-ice.org/scientist-resources/scientist-pd/polar-ice-scienti...

New RCS web hosting services and rates will take effect July 1, 2019. RCS rates are published online: https://www.gi.alaska.edu/research-computing-systems/service-rates#web

Websites previously hosted by GI Computer Resource Center will be affected by these changes. RCS will contact individual principal investigators to coordinate further.

The following options are currently available when building a web presence:

  • Google Sites is available at no cost and is ideal for personal research or small project sites. To get started, login to your UA Google Account and select “Sites” from the Option menu.
  • Drupal and WordPress work well for more complex web sites. RCS offers hosting and support for these content management systems.
  • Additional web applications may be supported via an RCS virtual machine. Contact RCS for a consultation to assess requirements, implementation, and fees.

Additional web hosting details are available online: https://www.gi.alaska.edu/research-computing-systems/web-services

The Geophysical Institute will be the "Super Saturday” focus at the Fairbanks Children’s Museum on Saturday, Nov. 17.

Astronomy in the portable planetarium will be showcased at this kid-friendly outreach event.

The Fairbanks Children's Museum is looking for others who would like to help represent GI research by bringing hands-on learning to young children on Saturday Nov. 17. Please contact Doreen Hayward at dehayward@alaska.edu or call x1910 to confirm participation.

UAF will be hosting two blood drives in October. Staff Council will host a blood drive from 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18 in the Wood Center Ballroom. The second blood drive will be from 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 19 in Room 501 of the Akasofu Building.

If you would like to register early go to donate.bloodbankofalaska.org or call the Blood Bank at 907-222-5630.

West Ridge Training Series flier.

The calendar has been set for the fall semester. All sessions will take place the second Tuesday of each month, 1 – 2 p.m. in the Globe Room.

Oct. 9: Comprehensive Financial and Distribution Income Planning
Presented by Scott Keyes, CRPC and Bobby Weaver, CFP, Keyes and Associates, Inc. A little planning goes a long way. A successful retirement begins with an income strategy backed by a personalized financial plan. By understanding and addressing retirement risk factors, you can confidently plan for the next phase of your life.

Nov. 13: Purchasing Guidelines
Presented by Katie Best, GI Business Office. Topics will include requisitions, work orders and account codes. Bring your questions!

Dec. 11: Intro to Video Editing Using Free Software
Presented by Sean Tevebaugh, Videographer, GI Design Services. Topics will include making a timelapse, video presentation and more. Have a need/concern about video making? Bring your questions! The talk will also cover video production software and camera options.

Click the announcement below to view and download a flier listing all of the training sessions.

Would you like to know when all the cool science events are happening at UAF? When you’re putting on a cool science event would you like help getting that information out?

The UAF Science Calendar posts information on science lectures, seminars, workshops, thesis/dissertation defenses, special events and other UAF science-related activities. Submit calendar items by email to UAF-SciCal@alaska.edu. Please include the name of the event, the sponsoring unit, name and affiliation of the presenter, location, date, start and end times, and a contact person's name, email address and/or phone number. Information can be submitted well in advance of the event as long as any changes to the information are also submitted as they become known.

How to subscribe to the Science Calendar

  • Visit http://www.cgc.uaf.edu/calendar.html to view the UAF Science Calendar
  • At the bottom-right corner of the calendar there is a Google Calendar widget (with a white-on-blue 'plus' sign). Click on the link.
  • Your calendar will pop up in your browser, with a prompt to "Add calendar." Click "Add." The UAF Science Calendar should now appear in the list on the left of your calendar labeled "Other calendars."

If you are logged into two Google accounts at once, for example your UA account and your personal account, the UAF Science Calendar may appear in the wrong one. If so, log out of all Google accounts except for the one that you wish to modify, OR log into it in a different browser, and repeat steps 2 and 3.

If you have questions about the science calendar, email UAF-SciCal@alaska.edu.

Please make sure you use the correct GI and UAF logos on all your research posters. You can download the logos at these websites:

Official GI Logo

Official UAF Logos

For assistance with GI and UAF logos, contact Design Services at x7146.

House and dog sitter needed

House and dog sitter needed

Needed: Responsible house and dog sitter in beautiful log home on Red Fox Drive (5 minutes from campus)
When: Early November through late February; dates are flexible.
The House: Log house with wood stove, oil heat, running water, washer-dryer, dishwasher and Internet. Heating oil recently filled and leach field pumped.
The Dog: Nine-year-old Alaska Husky. Loves being in the car and going on walks or skis on neighborhood trails.
Contact: Don Hampton at dhampton@alaska.edu or 455-2256

Needed: Responsible house and dog sitter in beautiful log home on Red Fox Drive (5 minutes from campus) When: Early November through late February; dates are flexible. The House: Log house with wood stove, oil heat, running water, washer-dryer, dishwasher and Internet. Heating oil recently filled...
Polaris jacket and bunny boots
Polaris jacket, size Men’s XL (great condition) $85 Small bunny boots (used), size 5N $15 If interested, please contact Doreen Hayward at x1910 or email at dehayward@alaska.edu
Do you have something you want to advertise?

Do you have something you want to advertise?

If you have something you would like to sell or are looking for, you can advertise in the weekly newsletter for free! We can run your advertisement as long as you would like us to. Just scroll to the bottom of the newsletter and click on "submit an item for the newsletter" or email Sue Mitchell with the details.

If you have something you would like to sell or are looking for, you can advertise in the weekly newsletter for free! We can run your advertisement as long as you would like us to. Just scroll to the bottom of the newsletter and click on "submit an item for the newsletter" or email Sue Mitchell...

Science Event of the Week

Oct 15, 2004

In 2004, a section of a Chinese satellite crashed into an apartment building in the village of Penglai, in southwest Sichuan Province, China. It wrecked an apartment at the top of the four-story building, but without causing injury since it crashed five minutes after the tenant, Huo Jiyu, had reportedly left her home. The cylindrical capsule demolished the roof, leaving a rubble of broken beams, roof tiles and bricks. The two-meter long, kettle-shaped unit was returning to earth after its planned separation from an orbitting satellite launched 18 days earlier. Chen Zugui, a senior spacecraft control systems designer at the China Academy of Space Technology, said it crashed due to weather conditions and mechanical problems in the capsule's propulsion system. The scientific satellite from which it came remained in its planned orbit.